Expand this Topic clickable element to expand a topic
Skip to content
Optica Publishing Group

Impact of Laser Phase Noise on Self-Coherent Transceivers Employing High-Order QAM Formats

Not Accessible

Your library or personal account may give you access

Abstract

Recent studies have shown that the self-coherent systems, including the bi-directional, the Stokes-vector-modulation direct-detection (SVM-DD), and the Kramers-Kronig (KK) schemes, have the potential to reduce the cost of short-reach networks. One of the most attractive features of the self-coherent systems is that they may eliminate the necessity of a narrow-linewidth laser, which is mandatory in the conventional full coherent systems employing high-order quadrature-amplitude-modulation (QAM) formats. On the other hand, it is also recognized that the laser phase noise may have a significant impact on the system performance if there exists a large length mismatch between the signal and the CW tone in the transmission paths. In this paper, we analyze the impact of laser phase noise on the self-coherent systems numerically and experimentally by considering the bi-directional system as an example case. As a result, we show that the performance of the self-coherent system can be described efficiently by using a limited number of normalized parameters. We then reveal the existence of a distinctive threshold on the path length mismatch that influences the bit-error-rate (BER) performance; the penalty increases in a stepwise manner as the length mismatch exceeds the threshold and converges to a constant value. Based on the results, we suggest the feasibility of employing high-order QAM formats to transmit >800 Gb/s signals per polarization using a 10-MHz-linewidth laser. Finally, proof-of-concept experimental results are presented to verify the theoretical and numerical analyses.

PDF Article

References

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Citation lists with outbound citation links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an Optica member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access Optica Member Subscription

Cited By

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Cited by links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an Optica member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access Optica Member Subscription

Select as filters


Select Topics Cancel
© Copyright 2022 | Optica Publishing Group. All Rights Reserved