Abstract

Inorganic–organic hybrid perovskite solar cells (PSCs) have recently seen considerable progress, and this has encouraged researchers to evolve and test numerous different and potentially improved device architectures. As a result, in this paper, a theoretical design for improving light absorption to obtain maximum photocurrent using NiO/GeSe core–shell nanostructures is introduced. The effects of using nanostructure arrays, based on the light trapping technique, on the light absorption, generation of carriers, absorption field profiles, and finally the photocurrent density of PSCs, have been investigated through a three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain approach. By selecting NiO and GeSe as the core and the shell materials, the absorption of the active layer has been increased, relative to the use of a conventional planar structure. This core–shell nanostructure leads to a reduction in the carrier recombination within the PSC proposed design. The results obtained from our simulation show that the device performance is highly dependent on the height and materials used in the core–shell. Significantly, an optimal height of 160 nm was obtained for core–shell in a PSC design with a ${{\rm J}_{\textit{ph}}}$ value of ${27.23}\;{{\rm mA/cm}^2}$.

© 2021 Optical Society of America

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Corrections

25 October 2021: A typographical correction was made to the author listing.


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