Abstract

A comparative study of picosecond mid-IR difference frequency generation in a wide wavelength range of 4.6-10.8 µm in a simple down-converter based on the 8-mm long, high-damage-threshold crystals of LiGaS2 or LiGaSe2 under the 5-mJ, 20-ps, 1.064-µm Nd:YAG laser pumping and the single-pass crystalline (CaCO3, BaWO4, CVD-diamond) Raman laser seeding was presented. 10-µJ-level, narrowband (<2 cm−1) generation at discrete wavelengths of 4.6, 5.4, 7.5, and 9.2 µm with the optical frequencies equal to the vibrational Raman frequency or its second harmonic of various crystalline Raman seeders was demonstrated. Optimization of the pump spot and mode-matching between the pump and signal spots allowed to increase the output pulse energy up to 50 µJ in the case of LiGaSe2.

© 2020 Optical Society of America under the terms of the OSA Open Access Publishing Agreement

1. Introduction

Discovery and investigation of perspective nonlinear crystals for nonlinear optical devices down-converting the near-infrared (IR) solid-state laser frequency (∼ 1 µm) directly into the mid-IR range (3-30 µm) present one of the most important trends in nonlinear optics [1]. Such radiation has a great potential of applications in science, technology, medicine, and biology. It is interesting to generate high-energy, narrowband, mid-IR laser pulses spectrally positioned at the narrowband absorption lines of molecules, for example H2O, N2O, CO2, CO, HCl, C2H6, CH2O (formaldehyde). Detection of such molecules can be used for human breath analysis, environmental monitoring, and remote sensing. There are also possible applications in medical surgery, nano- and biotechnologies, and others [2]. Various phosphide, selenide, and sulphide non-oxide crystals having high second order nonlinearity and transparency in a wide spectral range from visible up to mid-IR range can be used for frequency conversion. These materials exhibit the smallest bandgap and two-photon absorption limitations at tight focusing [1]. On the other hand, using highly nonlinear phosphide crystals is limited by a relatively narrow transmission range due to their narrow bandgap (∼ 2 eV). This results either in losses at the near-IR pump wavelength (1-2 µm) because of single and two-photon absorption in ZnGeP2 and CdSiP2 [3,4], or absorption losses at the mid-IR idler wavelength longer than ∼ 6.5 µm in CdSiP2 [4,5]. Selenide and sulphide crystals have wider bandgap and transmission range. A well-known AgGaS2 crystal is widely used because of reasonably wide bandgap (2.7 eV) and transmission range (0.5-12 µm), but its thermal conductivity (1.5 W/m·K [1]) and damage threshold (0.2 J/cm2 at nanoseconds [6] and 0.06 J/cm2 at picoseconds [7]) are quite low limiting the output power or complicating the down-conversion devices. For example, in the work [7] a high (50 µJ) level energy output at 5-12 µm mid-IR picosecond pulses under pumping by a 4-mJ, 25-ps, 1.064-µm Nd:YAG laser has been obtained only in the complicated down-conversion system based on two 18 mm long AgGaS2 crystals allowing to decrease the radiation fluence to values lower than the AgGaS2 crystal damage threshold.

Among the non-oxide nonlinear optical crystals transparent beyond 5 µm, the orthorhombic lithium ternary chalcogenides LiGaS2, LiGaSe2, LiInS2, and LiInSe2 are unique crystals having the widest bandgap (wider than 3 eV) and transmission range (0.4-12 µm). These crystals have also high damage threshold, but their nonlinearity is relatively low [8]. Their linear and nonlinear optical properties have been characterized recently when the technology for growing large-size single crystals in good optical-quality had been developed [9]. Notwithstanding the nonlinear coefficient of LiGaS2 and LiInS2 is lower (6-7 pm/V) than of LiGaSe2 and LiInSe2 (9-11 pm/V), the LiGaS2 crystal damage threshold at nanosecond pumping is significantly higher and amounts ∼3.3 J/cm2 [10] against 1 J/cm2 for the LiInS2 crystal [11] and 0.4-0.5 J/cm2 for the LiGaSe2 and LiInSe2 crystals [1214]. In the work [14] all these crystals with an equal length of 3 mm were compared for femtosecond difference frequency generation (DFG) at 4-11 µm. It was demonstrated that the sulphide (LiGaS2 and LiInS2) crystals made it possible to obtain several times higher output energies (tens of nJ) for femtosecond pulses because of higher damage threshold. Picosecond DFG was realized earlier in the LiInSe2 and LiInS2 [15,16]. In [15], picosecond DFG in the LiInSe2 crystal at 5-12 µm was realized with a high repetition rate (80 MHz), but the individual pulse energy was very low (< nJ). In [16], picosecond DFG in the high-damage-threshold LiInS2 crystal (12 mm long) at 5-6.7 µm was realized with low repetition rate (10 Hz), but with high (a 100-µJ level) pulse energy output that allowed to apply it for the surface-specific sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy of peptides. However this high-energy LiInS2 down-converter required a very high energy picosecond pump source (25-mJ, 10-Hz, 1.064-µm Nd:YAG laser) and a complicated seeding system based on a frequency doubler and an optical parametric generator/amplifier.

Another interesting possibility to realize a narrowband seeder for the mid-IR DFG is stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) of the pump laser radiation generating the signal wave for DFG at the first Stokes SRS wavelength of λs = (λp−1νR)−1, where λp is the pump wavelength, νR is the Raman frequency (in cm−1) of the Raman medium. In this case, the idler wavenumber λi−1 in the DFG process will be equal to the Raman frequency νR (λi−1 = λp−1λs−1 = νR). So, it is possible to select various Raman media for seeding of the DFG at various discrete mid-IR wavelengths. Recently, in the work [17], the Raman seeder based on the single-pass SRS conversion in deuterated benzene C6D6 (νR = 944.7 cm−1) was proposed for the picosecond DFG in the GaSe. Generated radiation was spectrally positioned at a wavelength of 10.6 µm with narrower spectrum in comparison with the traditional DFG system [18] allowing to obtain more energetic (up to 3 µJ) narrowband picosecond seed pulses for high-power CO2 laser amplifiers. Using the picosecond neodymium solid-state laser as a pump source allows also developing a very simple Raman seeder based on single-pass Raman conversion in crystals with various Raman frequencies. The point is that the single-pass SRS generation threshold in crystals under picosecond laser pumping is the lowest relative to optical damage threshold in comparison with the cases of nanosecond and femtosecond pumping. This is caused by relatively low optical damage threshold at nanosecond pumping and relatively high SRS generation threshold at femtosecond pumping (when pulse duration is shorter than picosecond dephasing time of Raman-active modes in crystals). In our previous work [19], utilization of a CaCO3 crystal (νR = 1086 cm−1) as the single-pass Raman seeder has been proposed and realized for the DFG at various mid-IR wavelengths using not only the first Stokes, but also higher order Stokes SRS components for the signal allowing to obtain the idler wavenumber equal to not only the Raman frequency νR, but also to its multiple harmonics. Low-energy (∼ 0.1 µJ) picosecond DFG in LiGaS2 at 9.2 µm (λi−1 = νR) and 4.6 µm (λi−1 = 2νR) under the picosecond Nd:YAG laser pumping and the single-pass CaCO3 Raman laser seeding has been obtained.

In this work, we present a comparative study of high-energy picosecond mid-IR DFG at discrete wavelengths of 4.6, 5.4, 7.5, 9.2, and 10.8 µm in a simple down-converter based on the 8 mm long crystals of LiGaS2 or LiGaSe2 under the 5-mJ, 20-ps, 1.064-µm Nd:YAG laser pumping and the single-pass crystalline Raman laser seeding. In comparison with our previous work [19], we have now achieved high energy (up to 50 µJ) output at various wavelengths in the range of 4.6-10.8 µm using not only CaCO3, but also BaWO4 and diamond as a crystalline Raman seeder generating at the first and second Stokes SRS components. High-energy picosecond mid-infrared frequency down-conversion in the LiGaS2 and LiGaSe2 crystals was experimentally realized for the first time to our best knowledge.

2. Experimental setup and down-converter characterization

The experimental setup of the frequency down-converter is presented in Fig. 1. The laboratory-designed, 10-mJ (max.), 20-ps, 5 Hz, 1.064-µm Nd:YAG laser was used as an excitation source for two stages of single-pass frequency conversion: the first stage was the Raman seeder and the second was the DFG in the LiGaSe2 or LiGaS2 crystal. Additional optical elements controlling the light-polarization, time-delay, beam splitting-combining, and focusing conditions between the pump laser, Raman seeder, and DFG crystals were used.

 figure: Fig. 1.

Fig. 1. The experimental setup of the frequency down-converter: λ/2: half-wave plate; M1, M2: concave mirrors, P: total reflection prisms, L1, L2: lenses.

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The polarized pump laser output beam was split by a birefringent wedge into the orthogonally polarized pump and signal beams (channels) and their energy ratio was optimized using a half-wave plate (λ/2). Total reflection prisms (P), plano-convex lenses (L1, L2), and concave mirrors (M1, M2) were used to align temporal and spatial overlaps of the combined pump and signal beams in the DFG crystal. L1 in the signal channel was also used to overcome the Raman generation threshold in the crystalline Raman seeder. M1 and M2 parameters were following: high transmittance (HT) @ 1.06 µm, high reflectivity (HR) @ Raman wavelengths (∼1.2-1.4 µm); concave, various curvatures (r = 100/500/1000 mm) in order to obtain requested signal beam diameter in the DFG crystal.

As the crystalline Raman seeder, various Raman crystals were used: BaWO4, CaCO3, and diamond having characteristics presented in Table 1. The pump laser pulse duration of τp= 20 ps is comparable with the vibrational dephasing time τR of the crystals (see Table 1), and therefore the SRS process is transient and determined by not only the Raman gain g, but also the ratio τp/τR. In this case, SRS generation threshold can be estimated [20] as

$$g \cdot I_p^{th} \cdot L \approx 25 \cdot ({1 + 8.2 \cdot {\tau_R}/{\tau_p}} ),$$
where Ipth is a threshold value of the pump pulse intensity, L is the crystal length. Therefore, the CaCO3 crystal length should be 10 times longer than the diamond crystal length to get the same value of Ipth because of not only lower Raman gain, but also longer dephasing time in the CaCO3. So, we used the 0.5 cm diamond crystal (CVD grown, grade IIa, low birefringence, Element Six, Ltd), the 8 cm BaWO4 crystal (grown by the Czochralski method, GPI, Russia), and 6 cm CaCO3 crystal (natural, VIS First grade, Siberian field, Russia). All Raman crystals were oriented in order to obtain minimal SRS threshold. The SRS generation threshold was exceeded for all crystals using the same lens (L1 f = 750 mm) in the signal channel focusing the laser radiation into a beam diameter of ∼ 800 µm (FW1/e2) in the Raman crystal. The experimental SRS generation thresholds were observed at the input pulse energies of $W_p^{th}$ = 0.8, 0.2, and 1.0 mJ in the diamond, BaWO4, and CaCO3 crystals, respectively. These values are generally in an agreement with the theoretical values estimated using Eq. (1). Some disagreement with the estimation (the experimental value was 1.5 times lower than the estimated value) was observed for the short (0.5 cm) diamond crystal, that can be explained by essentially higher divergence angle of spontaneous Stokes seeding for SRS in such a short crystal requiring decreasing the empirical coefficient of 25 in Eq. (1).

Tables Icon

Table 1. Raman seeder characteristics [2227] together with signal and idler wavelengths summary (g is the Raman gain, νR is the Raman frequency, ΔνR is the Raman mode linewidth, τR = 1/(π·c·ΔνR) is the Raman mode dephasing time).

Figures 2(a) and 2(b) shows dependences of the phase-matching φ-angle on the idler wavelength for eo-e type-II phase matching in the XY plane (Θ = 90°) at 1.064-µm pumping calculated from the Sellmeier equations data for the biaxial LiGaSe2 [8] and LiGaS2 [21] crystals. The points show the phase-matching angles at the idler wavelengths of λi = 4.6, 5.4, 7.5, 9.2, and 10.8 µm derived from the signal waves listed in Table 1. It can be seen that the phase matching angles at the idler wavelengths higher than 4.6 µm are quite close (a difference isn’t higher than 10°), and therefore only slight rotation of the LiGaSe2 or LiGaS2crystal can be used for DFG in the whole idler wavelength range of 4.6-10.8 µm.

 figure: Fig. 2.

Fig. 2. Calculated dependences of the phase-matching angle on the idler wavelength at the 1.064-µm pumping for (a) LiGaSe2 and (b) LiGaS2. The points correspond to various Raman laser seeding wavelengths.

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In order to present a comparative study, the LiGaSe2 (Θ = 90°, φ = 34°) and LiGaS2 (Θ = 90°, φ = 39°) crystals with the equal length of 8 mm and cross-section of 4×4 mm2 were used. These samples were cut from the crystal boules grown on oriented seeds by the Bridgman-Stockbarger technique in a vertical setup (Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, SB RAS, and Novosibirsk State University). Precursors were Li (99.9%) and Ga, S, Se elementary components preliminarily purified to 99.999% [8,9,28]. The crystals were grown in a glassy carbon crucible, located inside a silica ampoule. The ampule was filled with Ar (1-1.5 atm). The low axial temperature gradient furnace (2.5 K/cm) was used for the crystal growth at a rate of 1 mm/day. As a result, 30 mm long single crystal boules with a diameter of 15 mm and high optical quality were grown and the experimental samples were polished. The samples were anti-reflection (AR) coated at the pump (1.064 µm) as well as signal (1.2-1.4 µm) spectral ranges.

Transmission spectra of both AR-coated crystals and their photos are presented in Fig. 3. The spectra were measured along the long side of 8 mm using a spectrophotometer (Shimadzu UV-3600) and FT-IR spectrometer (Nicolet). Slight noise at 5.5–7 µm is caused by water vapor. It can be seen that because of AR coating, the maximum transmittance was about 95% at 1.2-1.5 µm. The transmission spectrum of the LiGaSe2 is generally wider then of the LiGaS2 in agreement with previous works [e.g. 8]. We can see that transmission at 9.2 µm is only 9% in the LiGaS2 and 47% in the LiGaSe2. Generation at 10.8 µm is possible in the LiGaSe2 only because radiation at this wavelength is almost fully absorbed in LiGaS2 and transmittance in the LiGaSe2 is 23% only.

 figure: Fig. 3.

Fig. 3. Transmission spectra of 8 mm long, AR-coated LiGaSe2 and LiGaS2 nonlinear crystals. Slight noise at 5.5–7 µm is caused by water vapor. Photos of the AR-coated crystals are presented in insets.

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3. Experimental results

Part of pump laser radiation was directed into the signal channel (Fig. 1) and converted via single-pass SRS in the diamond, BaWO4, or CaCO3 Raman seeder into the signal wave whose frequency corresponds to the first or second Stokes SRS component. Some part of the SRS radiation was generated in conical waves because of phase-matched parametric Raman interaction [2426], but for further conversion, we used only the axial part of SRS radiation transmitted through an iris. Increasing the input pump pulse energy into the Raman seeder from the above mentioned SRS threshold value ($W_p^{th}$) by approx. 2 times resulted in increasing the SRS conversion efficiency into the axial component of the first Stokes Raman radiation up to 6% (90 µJ), 13% (52 µJ), and 14% (280 µJ) for the diamond, BaWO4, and CaCO3 crystal, respectively. Lower conversion in the diamond was probably caused by larger part of SRS radiation in conical waves that can be again explained by essentially higher divergence angle of spontaneous Stokes seeding in the short crystal. This crystal was also partially damaged. Further increasing the pump pulse energy in the Raman seeder led to the SRS conversion into the second Stokes also used as a signal wave for DFG. In the CaCO3 crystal, the second Stokes SRS threshold was at 2.3 mJ, and the 100-µJ pulse energy in the axial second Stokes component was generated at the input pump energy of 2.4 mJ. In the BaWO4 crystal, the maximum energy in the axial second Stokes component reached 44 µJ. The second Stokes from the diamond was not used in these experiments. Focusing conditions were not fully optimized here because our main interest was to generate signal wave for following DFG stage. Generally, the optimal focusing conditions are very different in crystals with different lengths, but it is necessary to note that SRS conversion efficiency can be increased up to 85% [24].

Various focusing conditions of the input pump beam into the DFG crystal were used because of different nonlinear coefficients and damage thresholds of LiGaS2 and LiGaSe2. “Small” and “large” pump spots of 350 and 780 µm in diameter (FW1/e2) were used (controlled by various lenses L2 f = 400/500 mm at various places in the pump channel). The input signal beam was kept at approximately fixed diameter of 650 µm by concave mirrors M1 and M2.

The results of comparative study of DFG at 4.6 µm in the LiGaS2 and LiGaSe2 crystals under the 1.064-µm picosecond Nd:YAG laser pumping and the 1.384-µm second Stokes CaCO3 Raman laser seeding for the small (350 µm) pump spot and the optimized ratio between the signal and pump energy inputs are presented in Fig. 4. Pump and signal energies were measured by an energy probe (Coherent J25 MB-LE), the idler and low-energy signal by a high-sensitive energy probe (Coherent J10 MB-LE). Idler energy was measured behind a set of Germanium filters blocking pump and signal radiation.

 figure: Fig. 4.

Fig. 4. Conversion characteristics into the 4.6 µm idler in the LiGaS2 and LiGaSe2 at the small (350 µm) pump spot and the optimized ratio between the signal and pump energy inputs.

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It can be seen that in the LiGaSe2 crystal with higher (∼ 10 pm/V [14]) nonlinearity, as the input (pump + signal) energy increases, the output energy growth was saturated at 12 µJ, conversion has its maximum of about 5% and even decreases down to 3.3% at further input pulse energy increase up to 320 µJ. Saturation of the output energy growth can be caused by back-conversion (sum-frequency generation) because of high energy in the idler. Increasing the input energy higher than 320 µJ was limited by an optical damage threshold of the LiGaSe2 crystal at the input radiation fluence of 0.35 J/cm2 causing darkening of the LiGaSe2 crystal output face after several hours of operation and emergence of grey tracks at the output face after that. The appearance of the grey tracks was partially reversible as in the case of femtosecond excitation described in [14]. This optical damage effect is similar (but at 6 times higher threshold) to that observed earlier for AgGaS2 at picosecond excitation [7] explained by some photochemical process induced by the laser beam. The output face damage can be also caused by self-focusing of the laser beam in LiGaSe2.

Using the LiGaS2 crystal having lower (∼ 6 pm/V [14]) nonlinearity at the same small pump spot made it possible to obtain unsaturated output energy growth at increasing input energy up to 560 µJ resulting in higher energy output up to 17 µJ and the conversion efficiency of 3%. The input energy was increased up to 560 µJ for the LiGaS2 (against up to 320 µJ for the LiGaSe2) because of higher measured optical damage threshold of 0.65 J/cm2. The character of the damage was similar.

Similar characteristics were obtained for all output wavelengths (4.6, 5.4, 7.5, and 9.2 µm) at the small and large pump spots in the LiGaS2 and LiGaSe2 crystals. Figure 5 demonstrates the overview of the results for the small (350 µm) pump spot at the 4.6 and 5.4 µm idler wavelengths and for the large (780 µm) pump spot at the 7.5 and 9.2 µm idler wavelengths too.

 figure: Fig. 5.

Fig. 5. Energy characteristics of idler waves generated by DFG in the LiGaS2 and LiGaSe2.

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It can be seen that the small pump spot was better for the LiGaS2 crystal with lower nonlinearity and allows obtaining 20-µJ output pulse energy of the 4.6 and 5.4 µm idler. The maximum input radiation fluence was close to the measured LiGaS2 damage threshold of 0.65 J/cm2 (at 20 ps) corresponding to the input energy of 0.62 mJ and the conversion efficiency of 3%. Using the small pump spot for the LiGaSe2 crystal with higher nonlinearity resulted in saturation of conversion, probably because of the back-conversion effect (for the 4.6 and 5.4 µm idler). The large pump spot (780 µm) was optimal for the LiGaSe2 crystal allowing to achieve the highest 50-µJ output pulse energy of the 7.5 µm idler and 20-µJ output pulse energy of the 9.2 µm idler (the lower energy is probably caused by the operation at the edge of the transmission range). The input radiation fluence was close to the measured LiGaSe2 damage threshold of 0.35 J/cm2 (at 20 ps) corresponding to the input energy of 1.7 mJ (conversion efficiency up to 3%). Higher output energy for the LiGaSe2 can be explained by better mode matching between the large pump spot (780 µm) and the signal spot (650 µm) in the DFG crystal.

Figure 6 demonstrates the mid-IR DFG spectra and spatial profiles for the obtained idler waves in the LiGaSe2 (similarly in the LiGaS2). The spectra were measured using a monochromator (Oriel 77250) together with a liquid nitrogen cooled mercury-cadmium-telluride (MCT) detector (Judson-Teledyne J15). The spatial profiles were measured using a beam profiling camera (Spiricon Pyrocam III). Narrowband idler waves at the discrete wavelengths of 4.6, 5.4, 7.5, and 9.2 µm with a good beam quality at high pulse energies (10-50 µJ) were obtained. The generated waves linewidths were measured to be close to the monochromator resolution limit of < 2 cm−1 (∼10 nm @ 7.5 µm) and they can be even narrower. It can be concluded that the idler wave linewidth should be comparable with the Raman mode linewidth (ΔνR = 1.2-1.6 cm−1, see Table 1) of the crystalline Raman seeder.

 figure: Fig. 6.

Fig. 6. Spectra of pump, signal and idler waves. Insets: idler beam profiles at respective wavelengths. Intensity of the presented spectra were normalized.

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Generation at 10.8 µm was achieved in the LiGaSe2 only and the output energy was at in the order of ∼100 nJ (close to the measuring probe resolution limit).

4. Conclusions

A comparative study of high-energy picosecond mid-IR difference frequency generation in the wavelength range of 4.6-9.2 µm in the LiGaS2 and LiGaSe2 crystals was presented. The developed frequency down-conversion system was pumped by the 10-mJ (max), 20-ps, 1.064-µm Nd:YAG laser. The narrowband signal wave for the DFG was generated by single-pass stimulated Raman scattering in Raman-active crystals: CVD-diamond, BaWO4, and CaCO3. The SRS conversion efficiencies and energies in the axial component of the first Stokes Raman radiation were up to 6% (90 µJ), 13% (52 µJ), and 14% (280 µJ) for the diamond, BaWO4, and CaCO3 crystal, respectively. Further increase of the pump pulse energy into the Raman seeder led to the SRS conversion into the second Stokes and the energies were 44 µJ and 100 µJ for the BaWO4 and CaCO3 crystal, respectively. Narrowband (<2 cm−1) generation of ∼20 ps pulses with energy higher than 10 µJ at discrete wavelengths of 4.6, 5.4, 7.5, and 9.2 µm with the optical frequencies equal to the vibrational Raman frequency or its second harmonic of various crystalline Raman seeders was demonstrated. The LiGaSe2 crystal with wider transmission band allowed to obtain also 10.8-µm generation, but with lower energy because of a transmission edge. Optimization of the pump spot and mode-matching between the pump and signal spots allowed to increase the output pulse energy at 7.5 µm up to 50 µJ in the case of LiGaSe2. The LiGaS2 crystal having higher damage threshold has potential for further increasing the output energy via the same optimization provided here for LiGaSe2.

Funding

Grantová Agentura České Republiky (18-11954S); Russian Science Support Foundation (19-12-00085).

Disclosures

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

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19. S. N. Smetanin, M. Jelínek, A. F. Kurus, L. I. Isaenko, and V. Kubeček, “Difference-frequency generation at 9.2 & 4.6 µm in LiGaS2 pumped by a 20-picosecond Nd:YAG/CaCO3 Raman laser,” IEEE Xplore Digital Library, Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO-PR, Hong Kong), W3A.52 (2018).

20. S. N. Smetanin, “Determination of the stimulated Raman scattering threshold for a pump pulse of arbitrary width,” Opt. Spectrosc. 121(3), 395–404 (2016). [CrossRef]  

21. K. Kato, K. Miyata, L. I. Isaenko, S. Lobanov, V. N. Vedenyapin, and V. Petrov, “Phase-matching properties of LiGaS2 in the 1.025–10.5910 µm spectral range,” Opt. Lett. 42(21), 4363–4366 (2017). [CrossRef]  

22. M. Murtagh, J. Lin, R. P. Mildren, and D. J. Spence, “Ti:sapphire-pumped diamond Raman laser with sub-100-fs pulse duration,” Opt. Lett. 39(10), 2975–2978 (2014). [CrossRef]  

23. V. G. Savitski, S. Reilly, and A. J. Kemp, “Steady-state Raman gain in diamond as a function of pump wavelength,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 49(2), 218–223 (2013). [CrossRef]  

24. P. Černý, H. Jelínková, P. G. Zverev, and T. T. Basiev, “Solid state lasers with Raman frequency conversion,” Prog. Quantum Electron. 28(2), 113–143 (2004). [CrossRef]  

25. S. N. Smetanin, M. E. Doroshenko, L. Ivleva, M. Jelínek, V. Kubeček, and H. Jelínková, “Low-threshold parametric Raman generation of high-order Raman components in crystals,” Appl. Phys. B 117(1), 225–234 (2014). [CrossRef]  

26. S. N. Smetanin, M. Jelínek, V. Kubeček, and H. Jelínková, “Low-threshold collinear parametric Raman comb generation in calcite under 532 and 1064 nm picosecond laser pumping,” Laser Phys. Lett. 12(9), 095403 (2015). [CrossRef]  

27. S. N. Smetanin, M. Jelínek, D. P. Tereshchenko, and V. Kubeček, “Extracavity pumped parametric Raman nanosecond crystalline anti-Stokes laser at 954 nm with collinear orthogonally polarized beam interaction at tangential phase matching,” Opt. Express 26(18), 22637–22649 (2018). [CrossRef]  

28. L. I. Isaenko and A. P. Yelisseyev, “Recent studies of nonlinear chalcogenide crystals for the mid-IR,” Semicond. Sci. Technol. 31(12), 123001 (2016). [CrossRef]  

References

  • View by:

  1. V. Petrov, “Frequency down-conversion of solid-state laser sources to the mid-infrared spectral range using non-oxide nonlinear crystals,” Prog. Quantum Electron. 42, 1–106 (2015).
    [Crossref]
  2. M. Ebrahim-Zadeh and I. T. Sorokina, eds., Mid-Infrared Coherent Sources and Applications (Springer, 2005).
  3. V. Petrov, Y. Tanaka, and T. Suzuki, “Parametric generation of 1-ps pulses between 5 and 11 µm with a ZnGeP2 crystal,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 33(10), 1749–1755 (1997).
    [Crossref]
  4. S. Chaitanya Kumar, M. Jelinek, M. Baudisch, K. T. Zawilski, P. G. Schunemann, V. Kubeček, J. Biegert, and M. Ebrahim-Zadeh, “Tunable, high-energy, mid-infrared, picosecond optical parametric generator based on CdSiP2,” Opt. Express 20(14), 15703–15709 (2012).
    [Crossref]
  5. A. Peremans, F. Cecchet, P. G. Schunemann, K. T. Zawilski, and V. Petrov, “Noncritical singly resonant synchronously pumped OPO for generation of picosecond pulses in the mid-infrared near 6.4 µm,” Opt. Lett. 34(20), 3053–3055 (2009).
    [Crossref]
  6. K. L. Vodopyanov, J. P. Maffetone, I. Zwieback, and W. Ruderman, “AgGaS2 optical parametric oscillator continuously tunable from 3.9 to 11.3 µm,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 75(9), 1204–1206 (1999).
    [Crossref]
  7. H. J. Krause and W. Daum, “High-Power Source of Coherent Picosecond Light Pulses Tunable from 0.41 to 12.9 µm,” Appl. Phys. B 56(1), 8–13 (1993).
    [Crossref]
  8. L. I. Isaenko, A. Yelisseyev, S. Lobanov, P. Krinitsin, V. Petrov, and J. J. Zondy, “Ternary chalcogenides LiBC2 (B = In, Ga; C = S, Se, Te) for mid-IR nonlinear optics,” J. Non-Cryst. Solids 352(23-25), 2439–2443 (2006).
    [Crossref]
  9. L. I. Isaenko, I. Vasilyeva, A. Merkulov, A. Yelisseyev, and S. Lobanov, “Growth of new nonlinear crystals LiMX2 (M = Al, In, Ga; X = S, Se, Te) for the mid-IR optics,” J. Cryst. Growth 275(1-2), 217–223 (2005).
    [Crossref]
  10. A. Tyazhev, V. N. Vedenyapin, G. Marchev, L. I. Isaenko, D. Kolker, S. Lobanov, V. Petrov, A. Yelisseyev, M. Starikova, and J. J. Zondy, “Singly-resonant optical parametric oscillation based on the wide band-gap mid-IR nonlinear optical crystal LiGaS2,” Opt. Mater. 35(8), 1612–1615 (2013).
    [Crossref]
  11. S. Fossier, S. Salaün, J. Mangin, O. Bidault, I. Thénot, J. J. Zondy, W. Chen, F. Rotermund, V. Petrov, P. Petrov, J. Henningsen, A. Yelisseyev, L. I. Isaenko, S. Lobanov, O. Balachninaite, G. Slekys, and V. Sirutkaitis, “Optical, vibrational, thermal, electrical, damage and phase-matching properties of lithium thioindate,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 21(11), 1981–2007 (2004).
    [Crossref]
  12. V. N. Vedenyapin, A. Boyko, D. Kolker, L. I. Isaenko, S. Lobanov, N. Kostyukova, A. Yelisseyev, J. J. Zondy, and V. Petrov, “LiGaSe2 optical parametric oscillator pumped by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser,” Laser Phys. Lett. 13(11), 115401 (2016).
    [Crossref]
  13. V. Petrov, J. J. Zondy, O. Bidault, L. I. Isaenko, V. N. Vedenyapin, A. Yelisseyev, W. Chen, A. Tyazhev, S. Lobanov, G. Marchev, and D. Kolker, “Optical, thermal, electrical, damage, and phase-matching properties of lithium selenoindate,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 27(9), 1902–1927 (2010).
    [Crossref]
  14. V. Petrov, A. Yelisseyev, L. I. Isaenko, S. Lobanov, A. Titov, and J. J. Zondy, “Second harmonic generation and optical parametric amplification in the mid-IR with orthorhombic biaxial crystals LiGaS2 and LiGaSe2,” Appl. Phys. B 78(5), 543–546 (2004).
    [Crossref]
  15. M. Beutler, I. Rimke, E. Büttner, V. Petrov, and L. I. Isaenko, “Difference-frequency generation of fs and ps mid-IR pulses in LiInSe2 based on Yb-fiber laser pump sources,” Opt. Lett. 39(15), 4353–4355 (2014).
    [Crossref]
  16. R. L. York, G. J. Holinga, D. R. Guyer, K. R. McCrea, R. S. Ward, and G. A. Somorjai, “A new optical parametric amplifier based on lithium thioindate used for sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopic studies of the amide I mode of an interfacial model peptide,” Appl. Spectrosc. 62(9), 937–940 (2008).
    [Crossref]
  17. E. C. Welch, S. Y. Tochitsky, J. J. Pigeon, and C. Joshi, “Long-wave infrared picosecond parametric amplifier based on Raman shifter technology,” Opt. Express 26(5), 5154–5163 (2018).
    [Crossref]
  18. M. N. Polyanskiy, M. Babzien, and I. V. Pogorelsky, “Chirped-pulse amplification in a CO2 laser,” Optica 2(8), 675–681 (2015).
    [Crossref]
  19. S. N. Smetanin, M. Jelínek, A. F. Kurus, L. I. Isaenko, and V. Kubeček, “Difference-frequency generation at 9.2 & 4.6 µm in LiGaS2 pumped by a 20-picosecond Nd:YAG/CaCO3 Raman laser,” IEEE Xplore Digital Library, Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO-PR, Hong Kong), W3A.52 (2018).
  20. S. N. Smetanin, “Determination of the stimulated Raman scattering threshold for a pump pulse of arbitrary width,” Opt. Spectrosc. 121(3), 395–404 (2016).
    [Crossref]
  21. K. Kato, K. Miyata, L. I. Isaenko, S. Lobanov, V. N. Vedenyapin, and V. Petrov, “Phase-matching properties of LiGaS2 in the 1.025–10.5910 µm spectral range,” Opt. Lett. 42(21), 4363–4366 (2017).
    [Crossref]
  22. M. Murtagh, J. Lin, R. P. Mildren, and D. J. Spence, “Ti:sapphire-pumped diamond Raman laser with sub-100-fs pulse duration,” Opt. Lett. 39(10), 2975–2978 (2014).
    [Crossref]
  23. V. G. Savitski, S. Reilly, and A. J. Kemp, “Steady-state Raman gain in diamond as a function of pump wavelength,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 49(2), 218–223 (2013).
    [Crossref]
  24. P. Černý, H. Jelínková, P. G. Zverev, and T. T. Basiev, “Solid state lasers with Raman frequency conversion,” Prog. Quantum Electron. 28(2), 113–143 (2004).
    [Crossref]
  25. S. N. Smetanin, M. E. Doroshenko, L. Ivleva, M. Jelínek, V. Kubeček, and H. Jelínková, “Low-threshold parametric Raman generation of high-order Raman components in crystals,” Appl. Phys. B 117(1), 225–234 (2014).
    [Crossref]
  26. S. N. Smetanin, M. Jelínek, V. Kubeček, and H. Jelínková, “Low-threshold collinear parametric Raman comb generation in calcite under 532 and 1064 nm picosecond laser pumping,” Laser Phys. Lett. 12(9), 095403 (2015).
    [Crossref]
  27. S. N. Smetanin, M. Jelínek, D. P. Tereshchenko, and V. Kubeček, “Extracavity pumped parametric Raman nanosecond crystalline anti-Stokes laser at 954 nm with collinear orthogonally polarized beam interaction at tangential phase matching,” Opt. Express 26(18), 22637–22649 (2018).
    [Crossref]
  28. L. I. Isaenko and A. P. Yelisseyev, “Recent studies of nonlinear chalcogenide crystals for the mid-IR,” Semicond. Sci. Technol. 31(12), 123001 (2016).
    [Crossref]

2018 (2)

2017 (1)

2016 (3)

L. I. Isaenko and A. P. Yelisseyev, “Recent studies of nonlinear chalcogenide crystals for the mid-IR,” Semicond. Sci. Technol. 31(12), 123001 (2016).
[Crossref]

S. N. Smetanin, “Determination of the stimulated Raman scattering threshold for a pump pulse of arbitrary width,” Opt. Spectrosc. 121(3), 395–404 (2016).
[Crossref]

V. N. Vedenyapin, A. Boyko, D. Kolker, L. I. Isaenko, S. Lobanov, N. Kostyukova, A. Yelisseyev, J. J. Zondy, and V. Petrov, “LiGaSe2 optical parametric oscillator pumped by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser,” Laser Phys. Lett. 13(11), 115401 (2016).
[Crossref]

2015 (3)

V. Petrov, “Frequency down-conversion of solid-state laser sources to the mid-infrared spectral range using non-oxide nonlinear crystals,” Prog. Quantum Electron. 42, 1–106 (2015).
[Crossref]

M. N. Polyanskiy, M. Babzien, and I. V. Pogorelsky, “Chirped-pulse amplification in a CO2 laser,” Optica 2(8), 675–681 (2015).
[Crossref]

S. N. Smetanin, M. Jelínek, V. Kubeček, and H. Jelínková, “Low-threshold collinear parametric Raman comb generation in calcite under 532 and 1064 nm picosecond laser pumping,” Laser Phys. Lett. 12(9), 095403 (2015).
[Crossref]

2014 (3)

2013 (2)

V. G. Savitski, S. Reilly, and A. J. Kemp, “Steady-state Raman gain in diamond as a function of pump wavelength,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 49(2), 218–223 (2013).
[Crossref]

A. Tyazhev, V. N. Vedenyapin, G. Marchev, L. I. Isaenko, D. Kolker, S. Lobanov, V. Petrov, A. Yelisseyev, M. Starikova, and J. J. Zondy, “Singly-resonant optical parametric oscillation based on the wide band-gap mid-IR nonlinear optical crystal LiGaS2,” Opt. Mater. 35(8), 1612–1615 (2013).
[Crossref]

2012 (1)

2010 (1)

2009 (1)

2008 (1)

2006 (1)

L. I. Isaenko, A. Yelisseyev, S. Lobanov, P. Krinitsin, V. Petrov, and J. J. Zondy, “Ternary chalcogenides LiBC2 (B = In, Ga; C = S, Se, Te) for mid-IR nonlinear optics,” J. Non-Cryst. Solids 352(23-25), 2439–2443 (2006).
[Crossref]

2005 (1)

L. I. Isaenko, I. Vasilyeva, A. Merkulov, A. Yelisseyev, and S. Lobanov, “Growth of new nonlinear crystals LiMX2 (M = Al, In, Ga; X = S, Se, Te) for the mid-IR optics,” J. Cryst. Growth 275(1-2), 217–223 (2005).
[Crossref]

2004 (3)

P. Černý, H. Jelínková, P. G. Zverev, and T. T. Basiev, “Solid state lasers with Raman frequency conversion,” Prog. Quantum Electron. 28(2), 113–143 (2004).
[Crossref]

S. Fossier, S. Salaün, J. Mangin, O. Bidault, I. Thénot, J. J. Zondy, W. Chen, F. Rotermund, V. Petrov, P. Petrov, J. Henningsen, A. Yelisseyev, L. I. Isaenko, S. Lobanov, O. Balachninaite, G. Slekys, and V. Sirutkaitis, “Optical, vibrational, thermal, electrical, damage and phase-matching properties of lithium thioindate,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 21(11), 1981–2007 (2004).
[Crossref]

V. Petrov, A. Yelisseyev, L. I. Isaenko, S. Lobanov, A. Titov, and J. J. Zondy, “Second harmonic generation and optical parametric amplification in the mid-IR with orthorhombic biaxial crystals LiGaS2 and LiGaSe2,” Appl. Phys. B 78(5), 543–546 (2004).
[Crossref]

1999 (1)

K. L. Vodopyanov, J. P. Maffetone, I. Zwieback, and W. Ruderman, “AgGaS2 optical parametric oscillator continuously tunable from 3.9 to 11.3 µm,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 75(9), 1204–1206 (1999).
[Crossref]

1997 (1)

V. Petrov, Y. Tanaka, and T. Suzuki, “Parametric generation of 1-ps pulses between 5 and 11 µm with a ZnGeP2 crystal,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 33(10), 1749–1755 (1997).
[Crossref]

1993 (1)

H. J. Krause and W. Daum, “High-Power Source of Coherent Picosecond Light Pulses Tunable from 0.41 to 12.9 µm,” Appl. Phys. B 56(1), 8–13 (1993).
[Crossref]

Babzien, M.

Balachninaite, O.

Basiev, T. T.

P. Černý, H. Jelínková, P. G. Zverev, and T. T. Basiev, “Solid state lasers with Raman frequency conversion,” Prog. Quantum Electron. 28(2), 113–143 (2004).
[Crossref]

Baudisch, M.

Beutler, M.

Bidault, O.

Biegert, J.

Boyko, A.

V. N. Vedenyapin, A. Boyko, D. Kolker, L. I. Isaenko, S. Lobanov, N. Kostyukova, A. Yelisseyev, J. J. Zondy, and V. Petrov, “LiGaSe2 optical parametric oscillator pumped by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser,” Laser Phys. Lett. 13(11), 115401 (2016).
[Crossref]

Büttner, E.

Cecchet, F.

Cerný, P.

P. Černý, H. Jelínková, P. G. Zverev, and T. T. Basiev, “Solid state lasers with Raman frequency conversion,” Prog. Quantum Electron. 28(2), 113–143 (2004).
[Crossref]

Chaitanya Kumar, S.

Chen, W.

Daum, W.

H. J. Krause and W. Daum, “High-Power Source of Coherent Picosecond Light Pulses Tunable from 0.41 to 12.9 µm,” Appl. Phys. B 56(1), 8–13 (1993).
[Crossref]

Doroshenko, M. E.

S. N. Smetanin, M. E. Doroshenko, L. Ivleva, M. Jelínek, V. Kubeček, and H. Jelínková, “Low-threshold parametric Raman generation of high-order Raman components in crystals,” Appl. Phys. B 117(1), 225–234 (2014).
[Crossref]

Ebrahim-Zadeh, M.

Fossier, S.

Guyer, D. R.

Henningsen, J.

Holinga, G. J.

Isaenko, L. I.

K. Kato, K. Miyata, L. I. Isaenko, S. Lobanov, V. N. Vedenyapin, and V. Petrov, “Phase-matching properties of LiGaS2 in the 1.025–10.5910 µm spectral range,” Opt. Lett. 42(21), 4363–4366 (2017).
[Crossref]

L. I. Isaenko and A. P. Yelisseyev, “Recent studies of nonlinear chalcogenide crystals for the mid-IR,” Semicond. Sci. Technol. 31(12), 123001 (2016).
[Crossref]

V. N. Vedenyapin, A. Boyko, D. Kolker, L. I. Isaenko, S. Lobanov, N. Kostyukova, A. Yelisseyev, J. J. Zondy, and V. Petrov, “LiGaSe2 optical parametric oscillator pumped by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser,” Laser Phys. Lett. 13(11), 115401 (2016).
[Crossref]

M. Beutler, I. Rimke, E. Büttner, V. Petrov, and L. I. Isaenko, “Difference-frequency generation of fs and ps mid-IR pulses in LiInSe2 based on Yb-fiber laser pump sources,” Opt. Lett. 39(15), 4353–4355 (2014).
[Crossref]

A. Tyazhev, V. N. Vedenyapin, G. Marchev, L. I. Isaenko, D. Kolker, S. Lobanov, V. Petrov, A. Yelisseyev, M. Starikova, and J. J. Zondy, “Singly-resonant optical parametric oscillation based on the wide band-gap mid-IR nonlinear optical crystal LiGaS2,” Opt. Mater. 35(8), 1612–1615 (2013).
[Crossref]

V. Petrov, J. J. Zondy, O. Bidault, L. I. Isaenko, V. N. Vedenyapin, A. Yelisseyev, W. Chen, A. Tyazhev, S. Lobanov, G. Marchev, and D. Kolker, “Optical, thermal, electrical, damage, and phase-matching properties of lithium selenoindate,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 27(9), 1902–1927 (2010).
[Crossref]

L. I. Isaenko, A. Yelisseyev, S. Lobanov, P. Krinitsin, V. Petrov, and J. J. Zondy, “Ternary chalcogenides LiBC2 (B = In, Ga; C = S, Se, Te) for mid-IR nonlinear optics,” J. Non-Cryst. Solids 352(23-25), 2439–2443 (2006).
[Crossref]

L. I. Isaenko, I. Vasilyeva, A. Merkulov, A. Yelisseyev, and S. Lobanov, “Growth of new nonlinear crystals LiMX2 (M = Al, In, Ga; X = S, Se, Te) for the mid-IR optics,” J. Cryst. Growth 275(1-2), 217–223 (2005).
[Crossref]

S. Fossier, S. Salaün, J. Mangin, O. Bidault, I. Thénot, J. J. Zondy, W. Chen, F. Rotermund, V. Petrov, P. Petrov, J. Henningsen, A. Yelisseyev, L. I. Isaenko, S. Lobanov, O. Balachninaite, G. Slekys, and V. Sirutkaitis, “Optical, vibrational, thermal, electrical, damage and phase-matching properties of lithium thioindate,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 21(11), 1981–2007 (2004).
[Crossref]

V. Petrov, A. Yelisseyev, L. I. Isaenko, S. Lobanov, A. Titov, and J. J. Zondy, “Second harmonic generation and optical parametric amplification in the mid-IR with orthorhombic biaxial crystals LiGaS2 and LiGaSe2,” Appl. Phys. B 78(5), 543–546 (2004).
[Crossref]

S. N. Smetanin, M. Jelínek, A. F. Kurus, L. I. Isaenko, and V. Kubeček, “Difference-frequency generation at 9.2 & 4.6 µm in LiGaS2 pumped by a 20-picosecond Nd:YAG/CaCO3 Raman laser,” IEEE Xplore Digital Library, Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO-PR, Hong Kong), W3A.52 (2018).

Ivleva, L.

S. N. Smetanin, M. E. Doroshenko, L. Ivleva, M. Jelínek, V. Kubeček, and H. Jelínková, “Low-threshold parametric Raman generation of high-order Raman components in crystals,” Appl. Phys. B 117(1), 225–234 (2014).
[Crossref]

Jelinek, M.

Jelínek, M.

S. N. Smetanin, M. Jelínek, D. P. Tereshchenko, and V. Kubeček, “Extracavity pumped parametric Raman nanosecond crystalline anti-Stokes laser at 954 nm with collinear orthogonally polarized beam interaction at tangential phase matching,” Opt. Express 26(18), 22637–22649 (2018).
[Crossref]

S. N. Smetanin, M. Jelínek, V. Kubeček, and H. Jelínková, “Low-threshold collinear parametric Raman comb generation in calcite under 532 and 1064 nm picosecond laser pumping,” Laser Phys. Lett. 12(9), 095403 (2015).
[Crossref]

S. N. Smetanin, M. E. Doroshenko, L. Ivleva, M. Jelínek, V. Kubeček, and H. Jelínková, “Low-threshold parametric Raman generation of high-order Raman components in crystals,” Appl. Phys. B 117(1), 225–234 (2014).
[Crossref]

S. N. Smetanin, M. Jelínek, A. F. Kurus, L. I. Isaenko, and V. Kubeček, “Difference-frequency generation at 9.2 & 4.6 µm in LiGaS2 pumped by a 20-picosecond Nd:YAG/CaCO3 Raman laser,” IEEE Xplore Digital Library, Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO-PR, Hong Kong), W3A.52 (2018).

Jelínková, H.

S. N. Smetanin, M. Jelínek, V. Kubeček, and H. Jelínková, “Low-threshold collinear parametric Raman comb generation in calcite under 532 and 1064 nm picosecond laser pumping,” Laser Phys. Lett. 12(9), 095403 (2015).
[Crossref]

S. N. Smetanin, M. E. Doroshenko, L. Ivleva, M. Jelínek, V. Kubeček, and H. Jelínková, “Low-threshold parametric Raman generation of high-order Raman components in crystals,” Appl. Phys. B 117(1), 225–234 (2014).
[Crossref]

P. Černý, H. Jelínková, P. G. Zverev, and T. T. Basiev, “Solid state lasers with Raman frequency conversion,” Prog. Quantum Electron. 28(2), 113–143 (2004).
[Crossref]

Joshi, C.

Kato, K.

Kemp, A. J.

V. G. Savitski, S. Reilly, and A. J. Kemp, “Steady-state Raman gain in diamond as a function of pump wavelength,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 49(2), 218–223 (2013).
[Crossref]

Kolker, D.

V. N. Vedenyapin, A. Boyko, D. Kolker, L. I. Isaenko, S. Lobanov, N. Kostyukova, A. Yelisseyev, J. J. Zondy, and V. Petrov, “LiGaSe2 optical parametric oscillator pumped by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser,” Laser Phys. Lett. 13(11), 115401 (2016).
[Crossref]

A. Tyazhev, V. N. Vedenyapin, G. Marchev, L. I. Isaenko, D. Kolker, S. Lobanov, V. Petrov, A. Yelisseyev, M. Starikova, and J. J. Zondy, “Singly-resonant optical parametric oscillation based on the wide band-gap mid-IR nonlinear optical crystal LiGaS2,” Opt. Mater. 35(8), 1612–1615 (2013).
[Crossref]

V. Petrov, J. J. Zondy, O. Bidault, L. I. Isaenko, V. N. Vedenyapin, A. Yelisseyev, W. Chen, A. Tyazhev, S. Lobanov, G. Marchev, and D. Kolker, “Optical, thermal, electrical, damage, and phase-matching properties of lithium selenoindate,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 27(9), 1902–1927 (2010).
[Crossref]

Kostyukova, N.

V. N. Vedenyapin, A. Boyko, D. Kolker, L. I. Isaenko, S. Lobanov, N. Kostyukova, A. Yelisseyev, J. J. Zondy, and V. Petrov, “LiGaSe2 optical parametric oscillator pumped by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser,” Laser Phys. Lett. 13(11), 115401 (2016).
[Crossref]

Krause, H. J.

H. J. Krause and W. Daum, “High-Power Source of Coherent Picosecond Light Pulses Tunable from 0.41 to 12.9 µm,” Appl. Phys. B 56(1), 8–13 (1993).
[Crossref]

Krinitsin, P.

L. I. Isaenko, A. Yelisseyev, S. Lobanov, P. Krinitsin, V. Petrov, and J. J. Zondy, “Ternary chalcogenides LiBC2 (B = In, Ga; C = S, Se, Te) for mid-IR nonlinear optics,” J. Non-Cryst. Solids 352(23-25), 2439–2443 (2006).
[Crossref]

Kubecek, V.

S. N. Smetanin, M. Jelínek, D. P. Tereshchenko, and V. Kubeček, “Extracavity pumped parametric Raman nanosecond crystalline anti-Stokes laser at 954 nm with collinear orthogonally polarized beam interaction at tangential phase matching,” Opt. Express 26(18), 22637–22649 (2018).
[Crossref]

S. N. Smetanin, M. Jelínek, V. Kubeček, and H. Jelínková, “Low-threshold collinear parametric Raman comb generation in calcite under 532 and 1064 nm picosecond laser pumping,” Laser Phys. Lett. 12(9), 095403 (2015).
[Crossref]

S. N. Smetanin, M. E. Doroshenko, L. Ivleva, M. Jelínek, V. Kubeček, and H. Jelínková, “Low-threshold parametric Raman generation of high-order Raman components in crystals,” Appl. Phys. B 117(1), 225–234 (2014).
[Crossref]

S. Chaitanya Kumar, M. Jelinek, M. Baudisch, K. T. Zawilski, P. G. Schunemann, V. Kubeček, J. Biegert, and M. Ebrahim-Zadeh, “Tunable, high-energy, mid-infrared, picosecond optical parametric generator based on CdSiP2,” Opt. Express 20(14), 15703–15709 (2012).
[Crossref]

S. N. Smetanin, M. Jelínek, A. F. Kurus, L. I. Isaenko, and V. Kubeček, “Difference-frequency generation at 9.2 & 4.6 µm in LiGaS2 pumped by a 20-picosecond Nd:YAG/CaCO3 Raman laser,” IEEE Xplore Digital Library, Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO-PR, Hong Kong), W3A.52 (2018).

Kurus, A. F.

S. N. Smetanin, M. Jelínek, A. F. Kurus, L. I. Isaenko, and V. Kubeček, “Difference-frequency generation at 9.2 & 4.6 µm in LiGaS2 pumped by a 20-picosecond Nd:YAG/CaCO3 Raman laser,” IEEE Xplore Digital Library, Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO-PR, Hong Kong), W3A.52 (2018).

Lin, J.

Lobanov, S.

K. Kato, K. Miyata, L. I. Isaenko, S. Lobanov, V. N. Vedenyapin, and V. Petrov, “Phase-matching properties of LiGaS2 in the 1.025–10.5910 µm spectral range,” Opt. Lett. 42(21), 4363–4366 (2017).
[Crossref]

V. N. Vedenyapin, A. Boyko, D. Kolker, L. I. Isaenko, S. Lobanov, N. Kostyukova, A. Yelisseyev, J. J. Zondy, and V. Petrov, “LiGaSe2 optical parametric oscillator pumped by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser,” Laser Phys. Lett. 13(11), 115401 (2016).
[Crossref]

A. Tyazhev, V. N. Vedenyapin, G. Marchev, L. I. Isaenko, D. Kolker, S. Lobanov, V. Petrov, A. Yelisseyev, M. Starikova, and J. J. Zondy, “Singly-resonant optical parametric oscillation based on the wide band-gap mid-IR nonlinear optical crystal LiGaS2,” Opt. Mater. 35(8), 1612–1615 (2013).
[Crossref]

V. Petrov, J. J. Zondy, O. Bidault, L. I. Isaenko, V. N. Vedenyapin, A. Yelisseyev, W. Chen, A. Tyazhev, S. Lobanov, G. Marchev, and D. Kolker, “Optical, thermal, electrical, damage, and phase-matching properties of lithium selenoindate,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 27(9), 1902–1927 (2010).
[Crossref]

L. I. Isaenko, A. Yelisseyev, S. Lobanov, P. Krinitsin, V. Petrov, and J. J. Zondy, “Ternary chalcogenides LiBC2 (B = In, Ga; C = S, Se, Te) for mid-IR nonlinear optics,” J. Non-Cryst. Solids 352(23-25), 2439–2443 (2006).
[Crossref]

L. I. Isaenko, I. Vasilyeva, A. Merkulov, A. Yelisseyev, and S. Lobanov, “Growth of new nonlinear crystals LiMX2 (M = Al, In, Ga; X = S, Se, Te) for the mid-IR optics,” J. Cryst. Growth 275(1-2), 217–223 (2005).
[Crossref]

S. Fossier, S. Salaün, J. Mangin, O. Bidault, I. Thénot, J. J. Zondy, W. Chen, F. Rotermund, V. Petrov, P. Petrov, J. Henningsen, A. Yelisseyev, L. I. Isaenko, S. Lobanov, O. Balachninaite, G. Slekys, and V. Sirutkaitis, “Optical, vibrational, thermal, electrical, damage and phase-matching properties of lithium thioindate,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 21(11), 1981–2007 (2004).
[Crossref]

V. Petrov, A. Yelisseyev, L. I. Isaenko, S. Lobanov, A. Titov, and J. J. Zondy, “Second harmonic generation and optical parametric amplification in the mid-IR with orthorhombic biaxial crystals LiGaS2 and LiGaSe2,” Appl. Phys. B 78(5), 543–546 (2004).
[Crossref]

Maffetone, J. P.

K. L. Vodopyanov, J. P. Maffetone, I. Zwieback, and W. Ruderman, “AgGaS2 optical parametric oscillator continuously tunable from 3.9 to 11.3 µm,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 75(9), 1204–1206 (1999).
[Crossref]

Mangin, J.

Marchev, G.

A. Tyazhev, V. N. Vedenyapin, G. Marchev, L. I. Isaenko, D. Kolker, S. Lobanov, V. Petrov, A. Yelisseyev, M. Starikova, and J. J. Zondy, “Singly-resonant optical parametric oscillation based on the wide band-gap mid-IR nonlinear optical crystal LiGaS2,” Opt. Mater. 35(8), 1612–1615 (2013).
[Crossref]

V. Petrov, J. J. Zondy, O. Bidault, L. I. Isaenko, V. N. Vedenyapin, A. Yelisseyev, W. Chen, A. Tyazhev, S. Lobanov, G. Marchev, and D. Kolker, “Optical, thermal, electrical, damage, and phase-matching properties of lithium selenoindate,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 27(9), 1902–1927 (2010).
[Crossref]

McCrea, K. R.

Merkulov, A.

L. I. Isaenko, I. Vasilyeva, A. Merkulov, A. Yelisseyev, and S. Lobanov, “Growth of new nonlinear crystals LiMX2 (M = Al, In, Ga; X = S, Se, Te) for the mid-IR optics,” J. Cryst. Growth 275(1-2), 217–223 (2005).
[Crossref]

Mildren, R. P.

Miyata, K.

Murtagh, M.

Peremans, A.

Petrov, P.

Petrov, V.

K. Kato, K. Miyata, L. I. Isaenko, S. Lobanov, V. N. Vedenyapin, and V. Petrov, “Phase-matching properties of LiGaS2 in the 1.025–10.5910 µm spectral range,” Opt. Lett. 42(21), 4363–4366 (2017).
[Crossref]

V. N. Vedenyapin, A. Boyko, D. Kolker, L. I. Isaenko, S. Lobanov, N. Kostyukova, A. Yelisseyev, J. J. Zondy, and V. Petrov, “LiGaSe2 optical parametric oscillator pumped by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser,” Laser Phys. Lett. 13(11), 115401 (2016).
[Crossref]

V. Petrov, “Frequency down-conversion of solid-state laser sources to the mid-infrared spectral range using non-oxide nonlinear crystals,” Prog. Quantum Electron. 42, 1–106 (2015).
[Crossref]

M. Beutler, I. Rimke, E. Büttner, V. Petrov, and L. I. Isaenko, “Difference-frequency generation of fs and ps mid-IR pulses in LiInSe2 based on Yb-fiber laser pump sources,” Opt. Lett. 39(15), 4353–4355 (2014).
[Crossref]

A. Tyazhev, V. N. Vedenyapin, G. Marchev, L. I. Isaenko, D. Kolker, S. Lobanov, V. Petrov, A. Yelisseyev, M. Starikova, and J. J. Zondy, “Singly-resonant optical parametric oscillation based on the wide band-gap mid-IR nonlinear optical crystal LiGaS2,” Opt. Mater. 35(8), 1612–1615 (2013).
[Crossref]

V. Petrov, J. J. Zondy, O. Bidault, L. I. Isaenko, V. N. Vedenyapin, A. Yelisseyev, W. Chen, A. Tyazhev, S. Lobanov, G. Marchev, and D. Kolker, “Optical, thermal, electrical, damage, and phase-matching properties of lithium selenoindate,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 27(9), 1902–1927 (2010).
[Crossref]

A. Peremans, F. Cecchet, P. G. Schunemann, K. T. Zawilski, and V. Petrov, “Noncritical singly resonant synchronously pumped OPO for generation of picosecond pulses in the mid-infrared near 6.4 µm,” Opt. Lett. 34(20), 3053–3055 (2009).
[Crossref]

L. I. Isaenko, A. Yelisseyev, S. Lobanov, P. Krinitsin, V. Petrov, and J. J. Zondy, “Ternary chalcogenides LiBC2 (B = In, Ga; C = S, Se, Te) for mid-IR nonlinear optics,” J. Non-Cryst. Solids 352(23-25), 2439–2443 (2006).
[Crossref]

S. Fossier, S. Salaün, J. Mangin, O. Bidault, I. Thénot, J. J. Zondy, W. Chen, F. Rotermund, V. Petrov, P. Petrov, J. Henningsen, A. Yelisseyev, L. I. Isaenko, S. Lobanov, O. Balachninaite, G. Slekys, and V. Sirutkaitis, “Optical, vibrational, thermal, electrical, damage and phase-matching properties of lithium thioindate,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 21(11), 1981–2007 (2004).
[Crossref]

V. Petrov, A. Yelisseyev, L. I. Isaenko, S. Lobanov, A. Titov, and J. J. Zondy, “Second harmonic generation and optical parametric amplification in the mid-IR with orthorhombic biaxial crystals LiGaS2 and LiGaSe2,” Appl. Phys. B 78(5), 543–546 (2004).
[Crossref]

V. Petrov, Y. Tanaka, and T. Suzuki, “Parametric generation of 1-ps pulses between 5 and 11 µm with a ZnGeP2 crystal,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 33(10), 1749–1755 (1997).
[Crossref]

Pigeon, J. J.

Pogorelsky, I. V.

Polyanskiy, M. N.

Reilly, S.

V. G. Savitski, S. Reilly, and A. J. Kemp, “Steady-state Raman gain in diamond as a function of pump wavelength,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 49(2), 218–223 (2013).
[Crossref]

Rimke, I.

Rotermund, F.

Ruderman, W.

K. L. Vodopyanov, J. P. Maffetone, I. Zwieback, and W. Ruderman, “AgGaS2 optical parametric oscillator continuously tunable from 3.9 to 11.3 µm,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 75(9), 1204–1206 (1999).
[Crossref]

Salaün, S.

Savitski, V. G.

V. G. Savitski, S. Reilly, and A. J. Kemp, “Steady-state Raman gain in diamond as a function of pump wavelength,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 49(2), 218–223 (2013).
[Crossref]

Schunemann, P. G.

Sirutkaitis, V.

Slekys, G.

Smetanin, S. N.

S. N. Smetanin, M. Jelínek, D. P. Tereshchenko, and V. Kubeček, “Extracavity pumped parametric Raman nanosecond crystalline anti-Stokes laser at 954 nm with collinear orthogonally polarized beam interaction at tangential phase matching,” Opt. Express 26(18), 22637–22649 (2018).
[Crossref]

S. N. Smetanin, “Determination of the stimulated Raman scattering threshold for a pump pulse of arbitrary width,” Opt. Spectrosc. 121(3), 395–404 (2016).
[Crossref]

S. N. Smetanin, M. Jelínek, V. Kubeček, and H. Jelínková, “Low-threshold collinear parametric Raman comb generation in calcite under 532 and 1064 nm picosecond laser pumping,” Laser Phys. Lett. 12(9), 095403 (2015).
[Crossref]

S. N. Smetanin, M. E. Doroshenko, L. Ivleva, M. Jelínek, V. Kubeček, and H. Jelínková, “Low-threshold parametric Raman generation of high-order Raman components in crystals,” Appl. Phys. B 117(1), 225–234 (2014).
[Crossref]

S. N. Smetanin, M. Jelínek, A. F. Kurus, L. I. Isaenko, and V. Kubeček, “Difference-frequency generation at 9.2 & 4.6 µm in LiGaS2 pumped by a 20-picosecond Nd:YAG/CaCO3 Raman laser,” IEEE Xplore Digital Library, Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO-PR, Hong Kong), W3A.52 (2018).

Somorjai, G. A.

Spence, D. J.

Starikova, M.

A. Tyazhev, V. N. Vedenyapin, G. Marchev, L. I. Isaenko, D. Kolker, S. Lobanov, V. Petrov, A. Yelisseyev, M. Starikova, and J. J. Zondy, “Singly-resonant optical parametric oscillation based on the wide band-gap mid-IR nonlinear optical crystal LiGaS2,” Opt. Mater. 35(8), 1612–1615 (2013).
[Crossref]

Suzuki, T.

V. Petrov, Y. Tanaka, and T. Suzuki, “Parametric generation of 1-ps pulses between 5 and 11 µm with a ZnGeP2 crystal,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 33(10), 1749–1755 (1997).
[Crossref]

Tanaka, Y.

V. Petrov, Y. Tanaka, and T. Suzuki, “Parametric generation of 1-ps pulses between 5 and 11 µm with a ZnGeP2 crystal,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 33(10), 1749–1755 (1997).
[Crossref]

Tereshchenko, D. P.

Thénot, I.

Titov, A.

V. Petrov, A. Yelisseyev, L. I. Isaenko, S. Lobanov, A. Titov, and J. J. Zondy, “Second harmonic generation and optical parametric amplification in the mid-IR with orthorhombic biaxial crystals LiGaS2 and LiGaSe2,” Appl. Phys. B 78(5), 543–546 (2004).
[Crossref]

Tochitsky, S. Y.

Tyazhev, A.

A. Tyazhev, V. N. Vedenyapin, G. Marchev, L. I. Isaenko, D. Kolker, S. Lobanov, V. Petrov, A. Yelisseyev, M. Starikova, and J. J. Zondy, “Singly-resonant optical parametric oscillation based on the wide band-gap mid-IR nonlinear optical crystal LiGaS2,” Opt. Mater. 35(8), 1612–1615 (2013).
[Crossref]

V. Petrov, J. J. Zondy, O. Bidault, L. I. Isaenko, V. N. Vedenyapin, A. Yelisseyev, W. Chen, A. Tyazhev, S. Lobanov, G. Marchev, and D. Kolker, “Optical, thermal, electrical, damage, and phase-matching properties of lithium selenoindate,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 27(9), 1902–1927 (2010).
[Crossref]

Vasilyeva, I.

L. I. Isaenko, I. Vasilyeva, A. Merkulov, A. Yelisseyev, and S. Lobanov, “Growth of new nonlinear crystals LiMX2 (M = Al, In, Ga; X = S, Se, Te) for the mid-IR optics,” J. Cryst. Growth 275(1-2), 217–223 (2005).
[Crossref]

Vedenyapin, V. N.

K. Kato, K. Miyata, L. I. Isaenko, S. Lobanov, V. N. Vedenyapin, and V. Petrov, “Phase-matching properties of LiGaS2 in the 1.025–10.5910 µm spectral range,” Opt. Lett. 42(21), 4363–4366 (2017).
[Crossref]

V. N. Vedenyapin, A. Boyko, D. Kolker, L. I. Isaenko, S. Lobanov, N. Kostyukova, A. Yelisseyev, J. J. Zondy, and V. Petrov, “LiGaSe2 optical parametric oscillator pumped by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser,” Laser Phys. Lett. 13(11), 115401 (2016).
[Crossref]

A. Tyazhev, V. N. Vedenyapin, G. Marchev, L. I. Isaenko, D. Kolker, S. Lobanov, V. Petrov, A. Yelisseyev, M. Starikova, and J. J. Zondy, “Singly-resonant optical parametric oscillation based on the wide band-gap mid-IR nonlinear optical crystal LiGaS2,” Opt. Mater. 35(8), 1612–1615 (2013).
[Crossref]

V. Petrov, J. J. Zondy, O. Bidault, L. I. Isaenko, V. N. Vedenyapin, A. Yelisseyev, W. Chen, A. Tyazhev, S. Lobanov, G. Marchev, and D. Kolker, “Optical, thermal, electrical, damage, and phase-matching properties of lithium selenoindate,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 27(9), 1902–1927 (2010).
[Crossref]

Vodopyanov, K. L.

K. L. Vodopyanov, J. P. Maffetone, I. Zwieback, and W. Ruderman, “AgGaS2 optical parametric oscillator continuously tunable from 3.9 to 11.3 µm,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 75(9), 1204–1206 (1999).
[Crossref]

Ward, R. S.

Welch, E. C.

Yelisseyev, A.

V. N. Vedenyapin, A. Boyko, D. Kolker, L. I. Isaenko, S. Lobanov, N. Kostyukova, A. Yelisseyev, J. J. Zondy, and V. Petrov, “LiGaSe2 optical parametric oscillator pumped by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser,” Laser Phys. Lett. 13(11), 115401 (2016).
[Crossref]

A. Tyazhev, V. N. Vedenyapin, G. Marchev, L. I. Isaenko, D. Kolker, S. Lobanov, V. Petrov, A. Yelisseyev, M. Starikova, and J. J. Zondy, “Singly-resonant optical parametric oscillation based on the wide band-gap mid-IR nonlinear optical crystal LiGaS2,” Opt. Mater. 35(8), 1612–1615 (2013).
[Crossref]

V. Petrov, J. J. Zondy, O. Bidault, L. I. Isaenko, V. N. Vedenyapin, A. Yelisseyev, W. Chen, A. Tyazhev, S. Lobanov, G. Marchev, and D. Kolker, “Optical, thermal, electrical, damage, and phase-matching properties of lithium selenoindate,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 27(9), 1902–1927 (2010).
[Crossref]

L. I. Isaenko, A. Yelisseyev, S. Lobanov, P. Krinitsin, V. Petrov, and J. J. Zondy, “Ternary chalcogenides LiBC2 (B = In, Ga; C = S, Se, Te) for mid-IR nonlinear optics,” J. Non-Cryst. Solids 352(23-25), 2439–2443 (2006).
[Crossref]

L. I. Isaenko, I. Vasilyeva, A. Merkulov, A. Yelisseyev, and S. Lobanov, “Growth of new nonlinear crystals LiMX2 (M = Al, In, Ga; X = S, Se, Te) for the mid-IR optics,” J. Cryst. Growth 275(1-2), 217–223 (2005).
[Crossref]

S. Fossier, S. Salaün, J. Mangin, O. Bidault, I. Thénot, J. J. Zondy, W. Chen, F. Rotermund, V. Petrov, P. Petrov, J. Henningsen, A. Yelisseyev, L. I. Isaenko, S. Lobanov, O. Balachninaite, G. Slekys, and V. Sirutkaitis, “Optical, vibrational, thermal, electrical, damage and phase-matching properties of lithium thioindate,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 21(11), 1981–2007 (2004).
[Crossref]

V. Petrov, A. Yelisseyev, L. I. Isaenko, S. Lobanov, A. Titov, and J. J. Zondy, “Second harmonic generation and optical parametric amplification in the mid-IR with orthorhombic biaxial crystals LiGaS2 and LiGaSe2,” Appl. Phys. B 78(5), 543–546 (2004).
[Crossref]

Yelisseyev, A. P.

L. I. Isaenko and A. P. Yelisseyev, “Recent studies of nonlinear chalcogenide crystals for the mid-IR,” Semicond. Sci. Technol. 31(12), 123001 (2016).
[Crossref]

York, R. L.

Zawilski, K. T.

Zondy, J. J.

V. N. Vedenyapin, A. Boyko, D. Kolker, L. I. Isaenko, S. Lobanov, N. Kostyukova, A. Yelisseyev, J. J. Zondy, and V. Petrov, “LiGaSe2 optical parametric oscillator pumped by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser,” Laser Phys. Lett. 13(11), 115401 (2016).
[Crossref]

A. Tyazhev, V. N. Vedenyapin, G. Marchev, L. I. Isaenko, D. Kolker, S. Lobanov, V. Petrov, A. Yelisseyev, M. Starikova, and J. J. Zondy, “Singly-resonant optical parametric oscillation based on the wide band-gap mid-IR nonlinear optical crystal LiGaS2,” Opt. Mater. 35(8), 1612–1615 (2013).
[Crossref]

V. Petrov, J. J. Zondy, O. Bidault, L. I. Isaenko, V. N. Vedenyapin, A. Yelisseyev, W. Chen, A. Tyazhev, S. Lobanov, G. Marchev, and D. Kolker, “Optical, thermal, electrical, damage, and phase-matching properties of lithium selenoindate,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 27(9), 1902–1927 (2010).
[Crossref]

L. I. Isaenko, A. Yelisseyev, S. Lobanov, P. Krinitsin, V. Petrov, and J. J. Zondy, “Ternary chalcogenides LiBC2 (B = In, Ga; C = S, Se, Te) for mid-IR nonlinear optics,” J. Non-Cryst. Solids 352(23-25), 2439–2443 (2006).
[Crossref]

S. Fossier, S. Salaün, J. Mangin, O. Bidault, I. Thénot, J. J. Zondy, W. Chen, F. Rotermund, V. Petrov, P. Petrov, J. Henningsen, A. Yelisseyev, L. I. Isaenko, S. Lobanov, O. Balachninaite, G. Slekys, and V. Sirutkaitis, “Optical, vibrational, thermal, electrical, damage and phase-matching properties of lithium thioindate,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 21(11), 1981–2007 (2004).
[Crossref]

V. Petrov, A. Yelisseyev, L. I. Isaenko, S. Lobanov, A. Titov, and J. J. Zondy, “Second harmonic generation and optical parametric amplification in the mid-IR with orthorhombic biaxial crystals LiGaS2 and LiGaSe2,” Appl. Phys. B 78(5), 543–546 (2004).
[Crossref]

Zverev, P. G.

P. Černý, H. Jelínková, P. G. Zverev, and T. T. Basiev, “Solid state lasers with Raman frequency conversion,” Prog. Quantum Electron. 28(2), 113–143 (2004).
[Crossref]

Zwieback, I.

K. L. Vodopyanov, J. P. Maffetone, I. Zwieback, and W. Ruderman, “AgGaS2 optical parametric oscillator continuously tunable from 3.9 to 11.3 µm,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 75(9), 1204–1206 (1999).
[Crossref]

Appl. Phys. B (3)

H. J. Krause and W. Daum, “High-Power Source of Coherent Picosecond Light Pulses Tunable from 0.41 to 12.9 µm,” Appl. Phys. B 56(1), 8–13 (1993).
[Crossref]

V. Petrov, A. Yelisseyev, L. I. Isaenko, S. Lobanov, A. Titov, and J. J. Zondy, “Second harmonic generation and optical parametric amplification in the mid-IR with orthorhombic biaxial crystals LiGaS2 and LiGaSe2,” Appl. Phys. B 78(5), 543–546 (2004).
[Crossref]

S. N. Smetanin, M. E. Doroshenko, L. Ivleva, M. Jelínek, V. Kubeček, and H. Jelínková, “Low-threshold parametric Raman generation of high-order Raman components in crystals,” Appl. Phys. B 117(1), 225–234 (2014).
[Crossref]

Appl. Phys. Lett. (1)

K. L. Vodopyanov, J. P. Maffetone, I. Zwieback, and W. Ruderman, “AgGaS2 optical parametric oscillator continuously tunable from 3.9 to 11.3 µm,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 75(9), 1204–1206 (1999).
[Crossref]

Appl. Spectrosc. (1)

IEEE J. Quantum Electron. (2)

V. Petrov, Y. Tanaka, and T. Suzuki, “Parametric generation of 1-ps pulses between 5 and 11 µm with a ZnGeP2 crystal,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 33(10), 1749–1755 (1997).
[Crossref]

V. G. Savitski, S. Reilly, and A. J. Kemp, “Steady-state Raman gain in diamond as a function of pump wavelength,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 49(2), 218–223 (2013).
[Crossref]

J. Cryst. Growth (1)

L. I. Isaenko, I. Vasilyeva, A. Merkulov, A. Yelisseyev, and S. Lobanov, “Growth of new nonlinear crystals LiMX2 (M = Al, In, Ga; X = S, Se, Te) for the mid-IR optics,” J. Cryst. Growth 275(1-2), 217–223 (2005).
[Crossref]

J. Non-Cryst. Solids (1)

L. I. Isaenko, A. Yelisseyev, S. Lobanov, P. Krinitsin, V. Petrov, and J. J. Zondy, “Ternary chalcogenides LiBC2 (B = In, Ga; C = S, Se, Te) for mid-IR nonlinear optics,” J. Non-Cryst. Solids 352(23-25), 2439–2443 (2006).
[Crossref]

J. Opt. Soc. Am. B (2)

Laser Phys. Lett. (2)

V. N. Vedenyapin, A. Boyko, D. Kolker, L. I. Isaenko, S. Lobanov, N. Kostyukova, A. Yelisseyev, J. J. Zondy, and V. Petrov, “LiGaSe2 optical parametric oscillator pumped by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser,” Laser Phys. Lett. 13(11), 115401 (2016).
[Crossref]

S. N. Smetanin, M. Jelínek, V. Kubeček, and H. Jelínková, “Low-threshold collinear parametric Raman comb generation in calcite under 532 and 1064 nm picosecond laser pumping,” Laser Phys. Lett. 12(9), 095403 (2015).
[Crossref]

Opt. Express (3)

Opt. Lett. (4)

Opt. Mater. (1)

A. Tyazhev, V. N. Vedenyapin, G. Marchev, L. I. Isaenko, D. Kolker, S. Lobanov, V. Petrov, A. Yelisseyev, M. Starikova, and J. J. Zondy, “Singly-resonant optical parametric oscillation based on the wide band-gap mid-IR nonlinear optical crystal LiGaS2,” Opt. Mater. 35(8), 1612–1615 (2013).
[Crossref]

Opt. Spectrosc. (1)

S. N. Smetanin, “Determination of the stimulated Raman scattering threshold for a pump pulse of arbitrary width,” Opt. Spectrosc. 121(3), 395–404 (2016).
[Crossref]

Optica (1)

Prog. Quantum Electron. (2)

V. Petrov, “Frequency down-conversion of solid-state laser sources to the mid-infrared spectral range using non-oxide nonlinear crystals,” Prog. Quantum Electron. 42, 1–106 (2015).
[Crossref]

P. Černý, H. Jelínková, P. G. Zverev, and T. T. Basiev, “Solid state lasers with Raman frequency conversion,” Prog. Quantum Electron. 28(2), 113–143 (2004).
[Crossref]

Semicond. Sci. Technol. (1)

L. I. Isaenko and A. P. Yelisseyev, “Recent studies of nonlinear chalcogenide crystals for the mid-IR,” Semicond. Sci. Technol. 31(12), 123001 (2016).
[Crossref]

Other (2)

M. Ebrahim-Zadeh and I. T. Sorokina, eds., Mid-Infrared Coherent Sources and Applications (Springer, 2005).

S. N. Smetanin, M. Jelínek, A. F. Kurus, L. I. Isaenko, and V. Kubeček, “Difference-frequency generation at 9.2 & 4.6 µm in LiGaS2 pumped by a 20-picosecond Nd:YAG/CaCO3 Raman laser,” IEEE Xplore Digital Library, Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO-PR, Hong Kong), W3A.52 (2018).

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Figures (6)

Fig. 1.
Fig. 1. The experimental setup of the frequency down-converter: λ/2: half-wave plate; M1, M2: concave mirrors, P: total reflection prisms, L1, L2: lenses.
Fig. 2.
Fig. 2. Calculated dependences of the phase-matching angle on the idler wavelength at the 1.064-µm pumping for (a) LiGaSe2 and (b) LiGaS2. The points correspond to various Raman laser seeding wavelengths.
Fig. 3.
Fig. 3. Transmission spectra of 8 mm long, AR-coated LiGaSe2 and LiGaS2 nonlinear crystals. Slight noise at 5.5–7 µm is caused by water vapor. Photos of the AR-coated crystals are presented in insets.
Fig. 4.
Fig. 4. Conversion characteristics into the 4.6 µm idler in the LiGaS2 and LiGaSe2 at the small (350 µm) pump spot and the optimized ratio between the signal and pump energy inputs.
Fig. 5.
Fig. 5. Energy characteristics of idler waves generated by DFG in the LiGaS2 and LiGaSe2.
Fig. 6.
Fig. 6. Spectra of pump, signal and idler waves. Insets: idler beam profiles at respective wavelengths. Intensity of the presented spectra were normalized.

Tables (1)

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Table 1. Raman seeder characteristics [2227] together with signal and idler wavelengths summary (g is the Raman gain, νR is the Raman frequency, ΔνR is the Raman mode linewidth, τR = 1/(π·c·ΔνR) is the Raman mode dephasing time).

Equations (1)

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g I p t h L 25 ( 1 + 8.2 τ R / τ p ) ,

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